Lambs Quarters

Lambs Quarters

Chenopodium album

This common weed has bagged appreciable health benefits, which is one of the traits of the species of the Amaranthaceae family. The tea made from Lamb’s Quarters leaves is quite fruitful for gastrointestinal tract disorders, especially diarrhea, stomach ache, internal bleeding, intestinal inflammation, and loss of appetite.

  • Plant type: Annual
  • Other names: Wild Spinach, White Goosefoot, Pigweed
  • Medicinal: Yes
  • Culinary: Yes
  • Ceremonial: No
  • Parts Used: Leaves and Seeds
  • Side Effects:
Use left and right arrows to navigate between tabs. Plants Informations

About Lambs Quarters

Lamb’s Quarters is an annual weed that is edible and grows in the wild. It is the most fabled plant and according to some archaeological reports, it is known to emerge on the surface of the earth even before the 16th century.

Lamb’s Quarters can reach a good height of 10 feet and contains bluish-green leaves that have white spots underneath them. It is further embellished by small, greenish, petal-less flowers that are present in a densely clustered fashion at the top of spikes.

This common weed has bagged appreciable health benefits, which is one of the traits of the species of the Amaranthaceae family. The tea made from Lamb’s Quarters leaves is quite fruitful for gastrointestinal tract disorders, especially diarrhea, stomach ache, internal bleeding, intestinal inflammation, and loss of appetite. Lamb’s Quarters strong decoction is immensely beneficial for washing off the skin irritation and other topical inflammatory disorders.

Lamb’s Quarters leaves are also used for beautifying purposes. Bathing in Lamb’s Quarters leaves water can rejuvenate and helps tighten up the saggy skin.

These wonderful wild greens can also be eaten raw in pasta, salads, sandwiches or it can be steamed like spinach, complimenting the main courses.

Growing

Lamb’s Quarters can be transplanted (using roots) or started via seeds. In most cases, it is recommended to initiate Lamb’s Quarters using seeds as this is the speediest process for impatient gardeners. It can be grown both indoors and outdoors. Some people prefer growing Lamb’s Quarters indoors, as a containerized plant, to confine its invasiveness.

Lamb’s Quarters mature seeds are saved in fall and dried till spring. They are then sown in spring in thoroughly raked soil that tends to hold moisture. The seeds are lightly covered to allow sunlight to works its magic.

Being a weed, Lamb’s Quarters is not much fussy about its environment and weather conditions. It can bear dry spells but it is advised to keep the soil moist by adding mulch for good medicinal and culinary yield.

Lamb’s Quarters plants grow at an extremely fast pace. Its seeds can sprout within one to two days, and in no time you can have good quality greens ready to be relished.

The seedlings of Lamb’s Quarters readily develop firm roots and shoots. The shoots develop into a vigorous plant that lodges its blooming phase from May till November. The tiny flowers are pollinated by wind.

Soon, the seed heads emerge that mature at the arrival of fall and get scattered using wind to produce similar parent plant copies.

 

Harvesting

Lamb’s Quarters seeds are harvested during fall to be used as a cereal. Also, its leaves are used which can be harvested at almost any time of the year. But usually young, diamond-shaped leaves are elected which have a serrated margin.

Lamb’s Quarter seeds can be collected by dusting off the dried flowers in a container whereas anvil pruners are good for pruning the leaves.

Lamb’s Quarters are recommended to be dried in a dehydrator until they feel crispy and attain papery texture. The dried herbs are then stored in an airtight jar for later use.

Usage

Steamed or raw, Lamb’s Quarters is an amazing weed that outshines among the crowds of other good-for-nothing weeds.

  • Tea - Dried Lamb’s Quarters leaves are steeped in water for 20 to 30 minutes and strained to yield Lamb’s Quarters tea.
  • Decoction - Dried Lamb’s Quarters leaves are boiled in water for 5 to 6 hours to produce a strong decoction for washes.